Ropati – Stuff and Storage

cartoon-lady-closet

Living on a boat is all about the art of simplicity, which is quite complicated in practise. Follow this way of life in the serie `Ropati`. Hopefully it will help you to understand more about the daily boat life.

In the end there is a lot of space in a boat, but still not enough for everything. I just have the things that I really need, which fits into three suitcases all together. In The Netherlands I already selected my stuff and there are just ten boxes left. You can read about this ‘process of dematerializing’ in another article about surfing and the minimalistic life.

The French Seaman has a little bit more things and among these are a lot of tools, but also a nice collection of cd’s and books. Furthermore there are a lot of sail guides, sail books, sail magazines and sail clothes. There are some maps with administration and accountancy, camera’s, laptops, chargers, bags, kitchen & bathroom stuff, food, drinks, clothes, shoes, more tools, surfboards, wetsuits, diving gear, bikes and a yogamat. All together I guess there is too much.

We really cannot allow ourselves to have more stuff. If we want something new, something has to leave the boat first. We only buy something new when something is broken and/or too old to be usefull. If you visit us and you like to bring a present with you, please bring some food or something to drink, while this will stay just temporary. Books, clothes, souvenirs, all kinds of bathroom and kitchen equipment… Very nice, but thank you. We try to save space, therefore we probably will give away your present to someone else, while we really don’t know where to put all the stuff anymore. In our serious attempt to live as simple as possible, we still have too much things. Wow.

 

Photo: thesweetlittlebird.blogspot.com

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Ropati – ‘Roof Terrace’ and Dinghy

`Roof terrace`

Living on a boat is all about the art of simplicity, which is quite complicated in practise. Follow this way of life in the serie `Ropati`. Hopefully it will help you to understand more about the daily boat life.

My favourite spot on Ropati is the ‘roof terrace’. This is the forward part of the deck, a little bit before the anchor, chain locker and just after the mast. If the weather and waves allow, then I prefer to watch the ocean from this place. Underneath the ‘terras’ is the trunk where the dinghy stays. We already have had some nice ‘dinghy’ adventures. The best memory I have is from the time we all felt in the water, while we were trying to get on land.

After arriving at our destination, where we go for anchorage, the first thing we do is unfolding the dinghy and inflate it to go on shore. The moment I get into the dinghy, my heart starts pounding and I feel like Colombus who is discovering new lands. How will the shore be, who will we meet, what will happen? In the end nothing really happens, except getting a wet ass, but the feeling is amazing. Especially after days of sailing. Entering land is almost like visiting the moon. We put our sealegs on land and with crazy steps we walk like two cosmonauts over the beach. Land, finally!

Ropati – Bedrooms

vegetarianduck.blogspot.com

Living on a boat is all about the art of simplicity, which is quite complicated in practise. Follow this way of life in the serie `Ropati`. Hopefully it will help you to understand more about the daily boat life.

There are three double bedrooms. Two in the aft and one in the front. This one is the captains room and only accessible for him and his first mate: c’est moi. Of course I don’t accept anyone else to enter this room, unless you belong to a very small group of friends, who has the honour to stay in our bed, while we sleep somewhere else. The room is big enough for two, but some nights we sleep separeted. One of us sleeps in the other double bedroom, so we are both very well rested the next day.

Besides that, sometimes I just like to sleep alone, because I need my space. I like to have all the covers for my own and I love laying in bed with my arms wide, my magazines spread all over the bed, rolling from one side to the other (which is very annoying for the French Seaman). Believe me or not, sleeping seperated once in a while works very well for the relationship, especially because we live together almost twenty four hours a day on circa twenty square meter. You know what? Enough details about the bedrooms.

 

 

 

Photo: vegetarianduck.blogspot.com

Ropati – Bathroom

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Living on a boat is all about the art of simplicity, which is quite complicated in practise. Follow this way of life in the serie `Ropati`. Hopefully it will help you to understand more about the daily boat life.

Two shower cabines, a sink for him and a sink for her, an electronic toilet that cleans itself, plus a bidet, and of course a normal bath, a bubble bath and, last but not least, a sauna. In your dreams. The ‘bathroom’ is one by one meter. There is a little toilet, a little sink, and a long hose with an unidentified object in the end, which you might call a shower. Well, what can I say. It works. There is a little window and this compensates the lack of space. In the morning, when I brush my teeths, I see the ocean right in front of me.  With such a beautiful views you don’t need that much, right?

Ok, that’s a lie. Sometimes I get frustrated. All my ‘toilet equipement’ (shampoo, tooth brush, floss, make-up, body lotion, razors, nail polish, EVERYTHING) is put together in one little sport bag (the French Seaman disagrees with the word ‘little)’. That’s my ‘mobile bathroom shelve’, by lack of space. Some mornings I can laugh about it, some morning I don’t think about it at all and some mornings. Ai, ai, ai. The big advantage of having a small bathroom is that you can clean it very quickly. Wow, what an advantage. The biggest disadvantage of having a very small bathroom with a wooden door is that everyone on the boat can hear your doing things you do in a bathroom. What else can I say. To be honest, I am always very happy to visit some family and friends, so I can use their spacious and luxurous bathroom. Women…

 

Photo: Bath boat by Wieki Somers

http://www.wiekisomers.com/

Ropati – Living Room

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Living on a boat is all about the art of simplicity, which is quite complicated in practise. Follow this way of life in the serie `Ropati`. Hopefully it will help you to understand more about the daily boat life.

During cold periods this is the place to be. Everything happens in the living room. Eating, hanging, chilling, reading, talking, receiving visitors, aperó’s, watching movies, etc. The living room has a lot of seats, so we can easily receive five to ten persons. After a couple of chilly and/or rainy days the koala’s start irritating me, as well as the lack of single chairs and the lack of space to practise my yoga. This only happens after daaaays of bad and cold weather.

When we are sailing the living room is the place were we meet each other. Might sound strange, but if the days are organized into shifts, sometimes you don’t talk with each other anymore. Why? Because if one person is sleeping, the other one is doing the watch. For days you live seperated and only when you try to cross the living room from the kitchen to the sleeping room, or the other way around, you meet each other. This is the moment you can have a small talk, before the other goes to bed or is going outside for the watch.

In warmer periods the living room turns into a storage room and functions mainly as an office. With sunny days it’s too hot to stay inside, so most of the breakfasts, lunches and dinners are outside in the cockpit, as well as other activities, including powernaps, readings, and relaxing. One nice detail: There is some street art in the living room. A sticker of Miss Tic fills the wall on the left side next to the cd-player.

Ropati – Gas, Water and Electricity

Water, Gas & Electricity

Living on a boat is all about the art of simplicity, which is quite complicated in practise. Follow this way of life in the serie `Ropati`. Hopefully it will help you to understand more about the daily boat life.

We use water in the kitchen and in the bathroom. In the kitchen are two sinks with three taps. Two taps are directly connected to the watertanks, and one of them has a special installation with a filter, so we can drink the water from the tanks. The third tap directly serves water from the sea. We use this water to rinse, so we save our fresh water. The two tanks of each 500 liter (so we have a maximum of 1000 liters water on board) are located underneath the two double bedrooms on each side of the kitchen. If the tanks are completly filled Ropati hangs with her heavy derriére deep in the water, so we have ‘to climb’ to the living room in the front.

As well the fridge, as the lights, as the navigation systems are only functioning with electricity. If you are just like me, and not really interested in this kind of ‘technical stuff’, please feel free to skip the next alinea. I totally understand. It took me some time to get interested in the electrical part of the boat, and I am still learning, so here is some information for so far I understand it myself. If you really want to know more about this subject send us a message and the French Seaman will reply.

Ropati has four ways of generating electricity. With a cable on land, during sailing with the hydro-generator, with solar panels and when we use the motor. The energy is loaded in two batteries and transported by cables. We can tap the electricity from several point in the boat, like in a house, but not when we are sailing. Then we can only use on special point which is directly connected to one of the batteries that is loaded by solar panels and/or the motor. Until here I understand my own explanation and that’s about is. It’s more complicated than this, but the most important thing is that we have electricity.

The cooker and oven are not electric, but they work on gas. Gas is explosive, therefore it stays outside the boat in the back of the cockpit. “Far away” from the fire. This is, of course, very relative, but at least we try to avoid all the risk. Some sailors use petrol, which is super safe, but you need the patience of an angel, while it takes hours to cook. By the way, gas is more practical as we can fill the bottles at almost every car station. If things are going wrong there are three fire extinguishers with special ABC powder and a fire blanket if something is on fire. It is highly recommended to use the extinguishers only in case of serious need, like a burning enging or exploding gasbottles, since the powder in the bottle will damage everything, including the engine.

Ropati – Kitchen

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Living on a boat is all about the art of simplicity, which is quite complicated in practise. Follow this way of life in the serie `Ropati`. Hopefully it will help you to understand more about the daily boat life.

Come on board of Ropati! First you have to climb on deck. Then you have to grab a cable to stay in balance. Now walk to the aft to ‘our balcony’ and mind your step, while you climb down to enter the cockpit. There you are, in front of the entrance. Congratulations, you have made it. Welcome on Ropati. Please, entrez.

To enter Ropati you have to walk from a little stair. Take care of your head. Even we bang our head against the ceiling almost every week. It’s part of the daily boat life, but it would be nice to avoid this. When you are down the stairs you are standing in the middle of the kitchen. Behind you are two bedrooms, on each side one, and on stabord side you can find the bathroom. Behind the stairs is a technical compartment and the engine room is below the floor, but this room is only very well known by the captain, alias the French Seaman. Behind the kitchen is the living room and another double bedroom.

The kitchen of Ropati is very big in comparison with many other kitchens on boats, but in comparison with a kitchen of an average house it is quite small. The reason why Ropati has a relatively big kitchen, is because the former owner re-built the interior of the boat themselves. This French family was living on Ropati for a couple of years with the four of them, so I guess they really wanted to have enough space to cook, while food is very important for French people. 😉

In the kitchen is a fridge, a number of cupboards with special equipment, to keep all the kitchen stuff on the right place during sailing, two sinks, a cooker with two pits, and an oven. Cooking on land, at anchorage or in a harbour is a piece of cake. You just have to think twice about the boiling and baking time of the food to decide which dish you start to cook with first. That’s it. Luckily the French Seaman and I both love to eat salads, soups and pasta’s, so two pits are enough for us. If you prefer to eat Indonesian rice tables, you might get a bit frustrated about the size of the cooker.

In general I am very satisfied with the equipment, except when we are sailing. Cooking in a postion of almost 90 degrees ;), just to prepare some crappy pasta, is not that fun. Some tools help to keep the pan at it’s place, like metal pan screws, and the cooker is fitted with articulations to correct the boat roll, but in general cooking during sailing is a challenge. Calling it ‘a challenge’ is an understatement, by the way. More stories about cooking and eating on a boat will follow.